McCoy Fatula, APCMcCoy
Fatula
Located in Roseville, CA
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Is it ever okay to keep children away from a parent in divorce?

Any time a California couple starts thinking about ending their marriage, they are likely aware that various obstacles and challenges might arise during the process. If they have children together, thoughts may focus on new parenting plans, who (if anyone) might have to pay child support, who the children should live with and more. Even after all is said and done, and a divorce is finalized, disagreements between parents often resurface.

A woman in another state wrote to an advice column, explaining how she worries that her former husband was poisoning her son's thoughts against her. Apparently, the child has visitation with his father two days every week. In addition to missing him very much while he is away, she's afraid his dad will cause stress by going to an extreme to pit the boy against her. In her letter, she asked if it might just be better not to allow her son to see his father to prevent such problems from occurring.

Most court officials, family counselors and other licensed guidance professionals agree that children typically fare best when provided ample time with both parents. In rare cases, extenuating circumstances might convince a court that visits with one or the other parent could be detrimental to a child. If the court has not recognized and ruled on such matters, then it is generally not acceptable to prevent a child from seeing a parent.

The court is typically of the opinion that a child should have as much time as possible with both parents after divorce. The mother mentioned here is certainly not the first one to worry about these types of parenting issues. Those facing similar situations in California have every right to contact a family law attorney for guidance.

Source: ksal.com, "Custody and Visitation Struggles?", Joan Jerkovich, Jan. 25, 2017

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