McCoy Fatula, APCMcCoy
Fatula
Located in Roseville, CA
916-945-2780

June 2016 Archives

Never too early to consider estate planning in California

California is an expansive and beautiful state, home to many young adults, as well as retirees seeking warmer climates and lives of leisure. Although each person's lifestyle differs, one thing remains common among all: there will come a time when each individual faces the end of his or her life. How prepared a person is, with regard to estate planning, depends on various factors.

California graduates may want to consider estate planning

When one thinks of executing documents to protect assets and provide for the futures of loved ones after death, it's common to think of doing so during mid-life years and beyond. However, some say that even high school graduates in California should be thinking about estate planning. In addition to focusing on future educational endeavors and prospective employment, planning one's estate may also be important.

Trusts can provide for special needs children

California families with special needs children understand and embrace the joys that such children can bring to their lives. Seeing the world through their eyes can be a gift, and most families would not change their family dynamic for anything. That said, there are certain challenges that a special needs child can face that will mean a lifetime of specialized care. Many families are concerned about what will happen when the parents are no longer able to provide that level of care. This is where special needs trusts can make a world of difference.

After estate planning, the next step is sharing the plan

At some point, a couple in California may begin to consider what will happen when they reach retirement age. Many couples who reach this point have questions, and they often turn to an attorney for answers. This may be the first step in estate planning, but it is not the last.

Trusts may help California parents provide for special needs kids

The lifespan of the average person seems to be increasing. This goes for all people in the United States, including those with special needs. For parents of children with Downs Syndrome or other mental disabilities, this may be a blessing but also a challenge when it comes to planning for retirement or crafting an estate plan. Some say that using trusts is one way California parents of special needs kids can provide for their futures.

What Is Parental Alienation?

Many parents have never heard of parental alienation. That is until they are faced with this issue during or after a divorce and child custody proceeding. Child custody issues can be difficult and stressful in and of itself. But when parental alienation is thrown into the mix by one or both parents, it is not only harmful for the parents but most especially harmful to the child.

Careful estate planning may help survivors avoid complications

In California and throughout the United States, families often strive to help their parents, siblings and other immediate relatives avoid stress in life. Taking careful estate planning steps while one is still of sound mind helps to achieve this in the here and now, and quite possibly in the future, as well. Consequently, not doing anything to prepare a will or other documents regarding personal assets, inheritances or related issues might lead to complicated and stressful situations for loved ones when probate issues arise after a death.

Maintaining control during business formations

Launching a new business in California can be an exciting, adventurous, albeit challenging time in an entrepreneur's life. Many situations can arise during business formations that delay start-ups or cause obstacles that must be overcome before success can be achieved. Many business owners want to make sure that they retain legal control when making decisions or entering litigation under such circumstances.

Estate planning in California may help avoid death tax

As the old saying goes, death and taxes are two things everyone can count on. When those two things combine, they have the makings of a nightmare. California does not have an estate or inheritance tax, but every state is subject to the federal estate tax, or "death tax." People who have assets above the exemption amount may consider estate planning if they are concerned about how this tax will affect their loved ones.

Student loan debt may impede California business formations

Many college students in California graduate with dreams of becoming successful entrepreneurs. Four years or more of post-secondary schooling provides ample time to dream big dreams and make plans for one's financial future. However, it seems that outstanding college loans are common impediments to business formations throughout the nation.

When a will is not part of estate planning in California

It is not uncommon for people in California to take steps to outline the distribution of their assets after death. Estate planning is a process through which a person can make known any desires regarding properties, business interests, family heirlooms or other valuables, as well as many other intentions concerning medical directives or powers of attorney. Not everyone includes wills in their estate plans; however, a failure to do so often has repercussions for family members further down the line.

Estate planning may help California families avoid stress

One thing all California residents can be certain of is that no one lives forever. While many people avoid the topic of their own mortality, they do think about their loved ones' futures and how best to help them avoid stress once they are no longer with them. For some, careful estate planning is a chosen means to that end.

Options When Your Ex Wants to Relocate Out-of-State

You feel like you are finally in a good place and routine with your child's schedule post-divorce. However, your ex has now come to you with some news: he or she got a new job and needs to move out-of-state. This is a stressful situation as you want your child to have stability and are worried about this big change. What do you do now? Move-away and relocation issues are complex and should really be handled by an experienced family law attorney in California.

Important facts when considering trusts in California

Most people in California have a basic understanding of what it means to execute a will. However, other areas of estate planning, such as trusts or advanced directives, tend to be a bit more complex and difficult to understand without legal guidance. Those who wish to craft as thorough an estate plan as possible may want to seek clarification on such issues before proceeding.

Exploring business formations in California

Entering the California business world for profit can be a very exciting endeavor. Typically, however, it is not without its challenges. Understanding the different types of business formations and determining the advantages and disadvantages of each -- according to one's individual needs, resources and goals -- is crucial toward developing a plan that has great potential for success.

Helping your family avoid future stress through estate planning

Many people in California and throughout the nation avoid topics that involve their own mortality. Some say they like to focus on living rather than waste time discussing the inevitable. However, stories abound of people who have died without having made any effort toward careful estate planning prior to death, resulting in contentious debates and stress among family members later.

Adoption and Termination of Parental Rights

Sometimes an adoption can go very smoothly. Especially if a biological parent does not contest a termination of parental rights. However, there are situations in which a biological parent does not want to relinquish parental rights and the legal process is not as simple. This is one of the many reasons that having an attorney for the entire adoption process is so important. Your rights and your child's rights are protected and advocated by an experienced family law attorney.

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